Prepare to use GitHub

Prepare to use GitHub with this learning path.

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Prepare to use GitHub with this learning path.

This path has been curated by the GitHub team.

Steps to complete this learning path 46
  1. Video: What is GitHub?

    Ever wondered how GitHub works? Let's see how Eddie and his team use GitHub.

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  2. GitHub Guides: GitHub Flow

    GitHub flow is a lightweight, branch-based workflow that supports teams and projects where deployments are made regularly. This guide explains how and why GitHub flow works.

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  3. Video: What's a repository?

    In this video, you will learn how to find the key pages and features in a GitHub repository.

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  4. GitHub Docs: Glossary

    The GitHub Glossary is a great resource for many terms, including the very important version control system used in GitHub: Git.

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  5. Git-SCM: What is Git?

    A part of the book Pro Git, this chapter explains what Git is and how it works as a version control system.

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  6. Docs: About repositories

    Read the official GitHub documentation about what repositories are, and what features they include.

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  7. Git basics: Getting a Git Repository

    This chapter of Pro Git is about cloning, an important part of working with Git on your local machine.

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  8. Video: Git Push and Pull

    Working locally has an interesting challenge of keeping the remote and local repositories update. Git pull and git push are network commands to help.

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  9. Git basics: Working with Remotes

    To be able to collaborate on any Git project, you need to know how to manage your remote repositories. Remote repositories are versions of your project that are hosted on the Internet or network somewhere.

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  10. From managing notifications to merging pull requests, GitHub Learning Lab’s “Introduction to GitHub” course guides you through everything you need to start contributing in less than an hour.

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  11. Docs: Collaborating with issues and pull requests

    Use the GitHub flow to track and discuss changes in issues, then propose and review changes in pull requests.

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  12. Docs: About labels

    Labels on GitHub help you organize and prioritize your work. You can apply labels to issues and pull requests to signify priority, category, or any other information you find useful.

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  13. This course will dive into how you can get your best work done by identifying when and how to request a review, how to perform a review for someone else's pull request, and other awesome collaboration methods.

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  14. GitHub Support Tips: Best practices for protected branches

    This article will explore best practices to help you maintain a healthy codebase without impairing collaboration. You will learn when and how to use required status checks, branch restrictions, required reviews and more.

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  15. If you're new to GitHub Pages, or you want to learn how to build and host a GitHub Pages site, you're in the right place.

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  16. This course will walk you through everything you need to start organizing ideas and collaborating using Markdown, a lightweight language for text formatting.

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  17. This course will teach you skills for finding relevant conversations, commits, and projects in a repository.

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  18. Merge conflicts are a normal part of working in Git. Learn why they happen and how to resolve them with ease.

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  19. GitHub Resources: Introduction to InnerSource

    Adopting InnerSource approaches to software development can be transformative but understanding the principles, and potential challenges, is critical to success.

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  20. This course walks you through some of the key concepts of InnerSource and helps you build up an internal toolkit for adopting InnerSource practices.

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  21. Docs: Organizing members into teams

    You can group organization members into teams that reflect your company or group's structure with cascading access permissions and mentions.

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  22. GitHub Docs: Fork Definition

    A fork is a personal copy of another user's repository that lives on your account.

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  23. Open Source Guides

    Open source software is made by people just like you. Learn how to launch and grow your project.

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  24. Learn how to work alongside the open source communities that build software you're already using, and put your business at the forefront of the world's most innovative and secure code.

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  25. Docs: Sponsoring open source contributions

    You can sponsor contributors, receive updates on developers and organizations you sponsor, and display a sponsor badge throughout GitHub

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  26. Add your own GitHub feature, automate workflows, and more with GitHub Apps.

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  27. GitHub Marketplace

    Add tools to help you build and grow

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  28. Learn how to create workflows that enable you to use Continuous Integration (CI) for your projects.

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  29. Create two deployment workflows using GitHub Actions and Microsoft Azure.

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  30. This course will walk you through using GitHub Actions to get your code in a deployable state once your CI workflows have completed.

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  31. Docs: GitHub Products

    GitHub offers free and paid products. You can see pricing and a full list of features for each product at https://github.com/pricing. For information on planned features and products, see the GitHub public roadmap.

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  32. GitHub: Pricing

    With plans for every developer, learn what options are available.

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  33. Docs: Access permissions on GitHub

    While you can grant read/write access to collaborators on a personal repository, members of an organization can have more granular access permissions for the organization's repositories.

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  34. Docs: Permission levels for an organization

    After you create an organization, you should give Owner permissions to a small group of people who will manage the organization account. Learn more about organization permission settings here.

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  35. Docs: Repository permission levels for an organization

    You can customize access to each repository in your organization with granular permission levels, giving people access to the features and tasks they need.

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  36. Docs: Permission level for a user account repository

    A repository owned by a user account has two permission levels: the repository owner and collaborators.

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  37. GitHub Features: Security

    We all play a role in securing the world’s code—developers, maintainers, researchers, and security teams. On GitHub, teams work together to secure the world’s software at every step.

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  38. Learn security best practices and keep your project’s contributions—and contributors—safe.

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  39. Docs: Securing your account with two-factor authentication

    You can set up your GitHub account to require an authentication code in addition to your password when you sign in.

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  40. Docs: Creating a personal access token

    You should create a personal access token to use in place of a password with the command line or with the API.

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  41. Docs: About SSH

    Using the SSH protocol, you can connect and authenticate to remote servers and services. With SSH keys, you can connect to GitHub without supplying your username or password at each visit.

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  42. Docs: Managing connections between GitHub Enterprise Server and GitHub Enterprise Cloud

    With GitHub Connect, you can share certain features and data between your GitHub Enterprise Server instance and your GitHub Enterprise Cloud organization or enterprise account on GitHub.com.

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  43. Docs: Audit logging

    GitHub Enterprise keeps logs of audited user, organization, repository, and system events. Logs are useful for debugging and internal and external compliance.

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  44. Docs: Using LDAP

    LDAP lets you authenticate GitHub Enterprise Server against your existing accounts and centrally manage repository access.

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  45. Docs: About authentication with SAML single-sign-on

    SAML SSO gives organization owners and enterprise owners on GitHub a way to control and secure access to organization resources like repositories, issues, and pull requests

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  46. Docs: Managing allowed IP addresses for your organization

    You can restrict access to your organization's assets by configuring a list of IP addresses that are allowed to connect.

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